Self Assessment Tool

Capacity Optimizer Tool

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Managing hospital capacity effectively involves many variables. Among them the number of staffed beds (medical, surgical, ICU), annual discharges, and average length of stay (ALOS). Adjusting these levers--reducing staffed beds in certain units, for example, or increasing bed turnover--may help you achieve your target utilization. But which levers should you pull, and how hard?

The Capacity Optimizer Self-Assessment Tool provides data that can help hospitals develop strategies for improving utilization. Simply input data on your staffed beds, annual discharges and ALOS, and the tool calculates your current utilization rate. Then, you can tweak the parameters to see how different operational scenarios will change utilization and the corresponding financial impact.

By enabling you "test drive" various approaches, the Capacity Optimizer tool can assist your organization in its efforts to improve capacity utilization.

The figures and calculations herein are estimates made for informational purposes only. As each hospital is unique, your facility may have other costs, capacities, or other variables that may not be reflected herein. GE Healthcare accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided in this tool.




The figures and calculations herein are estimates made for informational purposes only, and are based on GE Healthcare's prior experiences with its clients. The potential opportunities estimated in this tool are not intended to be a commitment, guaranty, or warranty from GE Healthcare. As each hospital is unique, your facility may have other costs, capacities, or other variables that may not be reflected herein. For a more detailed assessment of the potential for your particular facility, please contact your GE Healthcare representative. GE Healthcare accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided in this tool.


For more information see:
Assumptions:
  • Present value is calculated using a 5% discount rate.
Citations:
  • 1% increase in HH compliance associates with a -.6% MRSA reduction
    1. Nicolau Jr DV, et al. Evidence for a simple linear relationship between MRSA and hand-washing compliance. Letters to the Editor. Journal of Hospital Infection 2010; 75:136-147.
  • Hospital-acquired MRSA Rate: 0.41% of Discharges
  • Cost per event: $47,092
    1. Cummings KL, et al. Hand Hygiene Noncompliance and the Cost of Hospital-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010; 31:357-364.

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